Fryonic
Dude, you’re so edgy and politically incorrect. it’s totally ironic and satirical how you regurgitated those ancient and threadbare stereotypes. It reminds me of my great great great great grandpa, Cracker von Patriarch, who also challenged the status quo by embracing it with loving tenderness.

I don’t know where I came across this, but it’s witty as fuck  (via naartje)

+1

(via killyourenemies)

Take note college campuses (and the world, by extension).

(via note-a-bear)

Always reblog the Ballad of Cracker von Patriarch.

(via mumblingsage)

wtfmanga:

Obama’s plan to fix the economy

Pretty sure that’s Mamoru Chiba in the grey suit.

wtfmanga:

Obama’s plan to fix the economy

Pretty sure that’s Mamoru Chiba in the grey suit.

happiest:

if u don’t get a reply i’m either 

  • eating
  • sleeping
  • blogging
  • masturbating
  • watching tv series 
  • or i just hate you 

I’m doing all six right now.

helioscentrifuge:

runtime-err0r:

itsvondell:

you can take one man’s trash to another man’s treasure but you can’t make it drink

Fun fact: the blending of idioms or cliches is called a malaphor.

My personal favorite is “We’ll burn that bridge when we get to it.”

I looked it up b/c that was a very familiar idiom and how could it be wrong but then

image

yeah wow that’s spot on perfect

I had a girlfriend once that used malaphors, unintentionally I think. She was really good at it! She would say things like, “He eats like a fish”, so naturally that you wouldn’t think anything of it, but then three days later you would be, like … wait a minute … ??

You guys, I have seriously stuffed my face full of sugar everyday for the past six weeks, and every day the excuse has been “It’s Christmas”.

You guys, I have seriously stuffed my face full of sugar everyday for the past six weeks, and every day the excuse has been “It’s Christmas”.

pureponypleasure:

gay horses

signal boost

In the First World, Every Day is Overconsumption Day

It’s Thanksgiving, but not up here in Canada’eh. We had our Thanksgiving last month. Now all my friends on Facebook are moaning about how we don’t get to eat turkey and pie today.

But not me. I’m eating turkey and pie right now. I’m an adult. I’ll eat turkey and pie whenever I damn well please. Tomorrow I’m going to have ice cream for breakfast. Suck on that childhood.

korra-scenery:

Book Two: Spirits, Chapter Five: Peacekeepers

Inception of Propaganda

Location: Varrick’s Vessel, Docks, Yue Bay, Republic City

When Varrick starts up the projector, Bolin says to Korra “Don’t freak out; it’s not real”. It took me a moment to figure out that he was telling Korra that the moving images weren’t real. I guess if you had never seen a moving image before, it would be pretty freaky.

This is good news I think, in terms of Bolin’s character development. In this episode he was used for humor that was relatively subtle, compared to the “funny face machine” that he’s been mostly used for. I mean, he still had a funny reaction when Eska came on the screen, but that was part of the “don’t freak out” joke. He didn’t take his own advice.

Man, when this guy talks about someone behind their back, he really goes all out.

I like the fangirls in Ouran. They could have come across as some kind of criticism. They’re an undifferentiated mass, (mostly) without names, living vicariously through the lives of the (mostly) super-super-privileged. I suppose a mean-spirited director could use them to take shots at the audience.
But I don’t think that happened. They provide plot points, commentary, insight into the main characters, and of course, the premise. If it wasn’t for them, the Host Club wouldn’t exist. So if they were to represent the audience, I think it would be a respectful representation. 
When they turn their eyes on someone, everything changes for that character. I found this to be particularly funny during the Bossa Nova storyline.

I like the fangirls in Ouran. They could have come across as some kind of criticism. They’re an undifferentiated mass, (mostly) without names, living vicariously through the lives of the (mostly) super-super-privileged. I suppose a mean-spirited director could use them to take shots at the audience.

But I don’t think that happened. They provide plot points, commentary, insight into the main characters, and of course, the premise. If it wasn’t for them, the Host Club wouldn’t exist. So if they were to represent the audience, I think it would be a respectful representation.

When they turn their eyes on someone, everything changes for that character. I found this to be particularly funny during the Bossa Nova storyline.